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Saturday, December 5, 2020 | History

2 edition of Kentuckians. I have entered your state with the Confederate Army of the West ... found in the catalog.

Kentuckians. I have entered your state with the Confederate Army of the West ...

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Published by s.n. in Glasgow, Ky .
Written in English


Edition Notes

ContributionsConfederate States of America. Army. Dept. No. 2.
The Physical Object
Pagination1 broadside ;
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24589843M


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Kentuckians. I have entered your state with the Confederate Army of the West ... by Braxton Bragg Download PDF EPUB FB2

Genre/Form: History: Additional Physical Format: Print version: Bragg, Braxton, Kentuckians. I have entered your state with the Confederate Army of the West.

Kentuckians. I have entered your state with the Confederate Army of the West ([Glasgow, Ky.: s.n., Life in the Confederate Army Report of the proceedings of the Society of the Army of West Virginia, at its first three meetings: held at Moundsville, West Virginia, September 22d.

Kentucky was a border state of key importance in the American Civil officially declared its neutrality at the beginning of the war, but after a failed attempt by Confederate General Leonidas Polk to take the state of Kentucky for the Confederacy, the legislature petitioned the Union Army for assistance.

After early Kentucky came largely under Union control. Braxton Bragg has written: 'Kentuckians. I have entered your state with the Confederate Army of the West ' -- subject(s): Confederate Propaganda, History 'To the home guards of Kentucky. Many men opted to fight for the Confederate army, where a great number of them rose to high ranks.

With Kentuckians in Gray: Confederate Generals and Field Officers of the Bluegrass State, editors Bruce S. Allardice and Lawrence Kentuckians. I have entered your state with the Confederate Army of the West.

book Hewitt present a volume that examines the lives of these gray-clad warriors. Some of the Kentuckians to serve as 5/5(1). Kentuckians in Gray: Confederate Generals and Field Officers of the Bluegrass State - Kindle edition by Allardice, Bruce S., Hewitt, Lawrence Lee.

Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Kentuckians in Gray: Confederate Generals and Field Officers of the Bluegrass State.5/5(1). In a thread on another web site, someone asserted that men from Kentucky enlisted in the Union army much more frequently than in the Confederate army, but a 3 to 1 rations.

Someone coutered that the ratio was much lower, just 5 to 4. I went my Battles and Leaders and on page it says that Kentucky furnis men to the Union army. Book/Printed Material Kentuckians. The army of the Confederate States, has again entered your territory, under my command.

Kentuckians, I have entered your State with the Confederate Army of the West, and offer you an opportunity to free yourselves from the tyranny of a despotic ruler. We come not as conquerors or as despoilers, but to restore to you the liberties of which you have been deprived by a cruel and relentless foe.

Report of the state agent for Kentucky at Washington, made to the governor, January 1, (Frankfort, Ky., J.H. Harney, public printer, ), by Kentucky. State agent at Washington (page images at HathiTrust) Filed under: Kentucky -- History -- Civil war, from old catalog.

“Kentuckians,” proclaimed General Bragg on Septem “I have entered your state with the Confederate Army of the West, and offer you a chance to free yourselves from the tyranny of a despotic ruler.” Indeed, the reception was encouraging, many waving and cheering the Confederates.

“Kentuckians, I have entered your State with the Confederate Army of the West, and offer you an opportunity to free yourselves from the tyranny of a despotic ruler. We come not as conquerors or as despoilers, but to restore to you the liberties of which you have been deprived by a cruel and relentless foe.

Perhaps more than any other citizens of the nation, Kentuckians held conflicted loyalties during the American Civil War. As a border state, Kentucky was largely pro-slavery but had an economy tied as much to the North as to the South.

State government officials tried to keep Kentucky neutral, hoping to play a lead role in compromise efforts between the Union and the Cited by: 4. In Kentuckians in Gray, Allardice, author of More Generals in Gray, and Hewitt, author of Port Hudson, Confederate Bastion on the Mississippi, have compiled an anthology profiling more than Confederate generals and field officers with roots in the Blue Grass State.

Gustavus W. Smith entered the Confederate army as a major general at the beginning of the conflict, second in command of the major Confederate army in Virginia, and he left it as a major general in the Georgia state militia.

And therein lies the tale that illuminates much of his Confederate career. Kentuckians in Gray: Confederate Generals and Field Officers of the Bluegrass State: Author: Bruce S. Allardice, Lawrence Lee Hewitt: Publisher: University Press of Kentucky: ISBN:Subjects.

The Confederate States of America (CSA or C.S.), commonly referred to as the Confederacy, was an unrecognized republic in North America that existed from to The Confederacy was originally formed by seven secessionist slave-holding states—South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, and Texas—in the Lower South region of the United States, Capital: Montgomery, Alabama (until ).

For the U.S. army during the Mexican-American War see Army of the West (), and for the French Revolutionary army unit see Army of the West (). The Army of the West, also known as the Trans-Mississippi District, was a formation of the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War that was a part of the Army of saw action in the Battle of Pea Branch: Confederate States Army.

The numbers of Kentuckians in the Confederate army are not as exact but are estimated betw 7 The most famous Kentuckians who fought in the Civil War fought for the Confederacy, such as Sidney Johnston, Simon Buckner, John C.

Breckenridge, and John Hunt Morgan. The role that the Kentucky State Guard played in helping the. I enjoyed reading this book. Marshall puts forth the idea that Kentucky was a staunch Union state during the war, but spend the decades after glorifying her Confederate past.

The state erected dozens of Confederate monuments and celebrates Confederate holidays and heroes. Each chapter of the book offers unique insights to a fascinating state/5. "With Kentuckians in Gray: Confederate Generals and Field Officers of the Bluegrass State, editors Bruce S.

Allardice and Lawrence Lee Hewitt present a volume that examines the lives of these gray-clad warriors.

Some of the Kentuckians to serve as Confederate generals are well recognized in state history. Consequently, of the border states, only it ratified the 14th and 15th Amendments, guaranteeing civil and voting rights to African Americans.

But the state would hold out only briefly before a political conversion to Confederate state nearly as complete as Kentucky’s. Book Description: Historian E.

Merton Coulter famously said that Kentucky "waited until after the war was over to secede from the Union." In this fresh study, Anne E. Marshall traces the development of a Confederate identity in Kentucky between and that belied the fact that Kentucky never left the Union and that more Kentuckians fought for the North than for the.

The Confederacy comes to Kentucky was a slave state. During the Civil War, more Kentuckians served in Union regiments than Confederate ones, despite the deep divisions that made the conflict. With Jefferson Davis and His Generals: The Failure of Confederate Command in the West, Steven E.

Woodworth steps up to fill this gap with a first rate book that every serious There are far fewer that cover the situation of the Confederacy's western armies and generals, despite, or perhaps because of the fact that it was in the west that the /5.

The failure of Kentuckians to meet the Confederate call to service that summer and fall was a decisive moment in the war. Had tens of thousands joined Bragg’s and Smith’s armies, the Confederacy could have secured the Bluegrass State and pushed the nascent republic’s boundaries to the Ohio River.

Playing on that desire for preservation and a strong dose of pride, General E. Kirby Smith rallied Kentuckians to join the Confederacy and fight “FOR YOUR STATE” in a recruitment handbill published in When John Hunt Morgan and his men entered Georgetown, Kentucky, inthey claimed to be acting as liberators and protectors of the.

This is a quote from the state’s historical society. > As the Civil War started, states chose sides, North or South. Kentucky was the one true exception, they chose neutrality.

As Lowell H. Harrison wrote, to an outside observer the United States. Buy the Book: "Perryville: This Grand Havoc of Battle" is available from our Civil War Trust-Amazon Bookstore A native of Virginia, Kenneth Noe received his PhD from the University of Illinois and taught at West Georgia College for ten years before coming to Auburn in His major teaching and research areas are the American Civil War and.

Travel through history as The Civil War Muse leads you on battlefield tours. These educational expeditions in Kansas and Missouri describe the battles, gives biographies of key individuals, and tells what the soldiers faced.

In Creating a Confederate Kentucky, Anne E. Marshall traces the development of a Confederate identity in Kentucky between andbelying the fact that Kentucky never left the the Civil War, the people of Kentucky appeared to forget their Union loyalties and embraced the Democratic politics, racial violence, and Jim Crow laws associated with former.

In Kentuckians in Gray, Bruce Allardice and Lawrence L. Hewitt have contributed to and edited 39 fine biographical essays, one for every native or resident * Kentucky general officer. They assembled 26 other experts, many of whom are either the subject's modern biographer or have published major associated works.

Army of the West Major-General Earl Van Dorn assumed command of the troops in the Trans-Mississippi District of Western Department (No. 2), on Janu Out of the force grew the Army of the West, so called after March 4th.

It was largely composed of the Missouri State Guard. The government later re-entered the state but was again forced out after the Battle of Perryville. So there you have it. Not only was there an Ordinance of Secession passed by delegates from all over the state, but Kentucky was also admitted to the Confederacy by action of the Confederate Congress and President Jefferson Davis.

But there is so. The bluegrass region in the central part of the state houses the state's capital, Frankfort, as well as its two largest cities, Louisville and Lexington, the two of which together are home to over 20% of the state's population.

[3] Kentucky shares borders with Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio to the north, West Virginia and Virginia to the east, Tennessee to the south, and Missouri to the t city: Louisville.

Historian E. Merton Coulter famously said that Kentucky "waited until after the war was over to secede from the Union." In this fresh study, Anne E.

Marshall traces the development of a Confederate identity in Kentucky between and that belied the fact that Kentucky never left the Union and that more Kentuckians fought for the North than for the South.

Historian E. Merton Coulter famously said that Kentucky "waited until after the war was over to secede from the Union." In this fresh study, Anne E. Marshall traces the development of a Confederate identity in Kentucky between and that belied the fact that Kentucky never left the Union and that more Kentuckians fought for the North than for the : The University of North Carolina Press.

Kentucky Confederate state records for slaves and freedman who served or served with the Confederate States Army Established Enter Ancestor's Name or State Lived and Press Enter. Menu. Home Military Uniform State Records. I am looking for book recommendations on the confederate army and/or it's leaders to give as a gift.

I am currently considering Lee by Douglas Southall Freeman and Rebel Yell: The Violence, Passion, and Redemption of Stonewall Jackson by S. Gwynne. Civil War: According to the U.S.

census, Kentucky had a free population ofand an additional slave population of ,On ApPresident Abraham Lincoln sent a telegram to Kentucky governor Beriah Magoffin requesting that the Commonwealth supply part of the init troops to put down the rebellion.

Details concerning Confederate officers who were appointed to duty as generals late in the war by General E.

Kirby Smith in the Confederate Trans-Mississippi Department, who have been thought of generals and exercised command as generals but who were not duly appointment and confirmed or commissioned, and State militia generals who had field.

Kentucky Confederates is not a book intended to discuss the state's Confederate image. Its goal is to discuss the Jackson Purchase region of the state and how this region was easily the most pro-Confederate section of the state, particularly during the pre-war and early-war years, before many people in the rest of the state adopted similar attitudes as the Purchase .In Anne Marshall's book, Creating a Confederate Kentucky: The Lost Cause and Civil War Memory in a Border State, "image is everything" aptly describes Kentucky's ties to the Confederacy in the post-war years.

Marshall shows how Kentucky's identity as a "Confederate" state blossomed, starting soon after the end of the Civil War (being planted during the war .